Winter: Time to mix it up?

Winter: Time to mix it up? - Square Blades

We’ve all had that feeling where the thought of setting eyes on the grey machine is enough to make us run for the hills, but perhaps, when that mindset is present running for the hills is exactly what’s needed.

To achieve success in any sport, a large proportion of training must be dedicated to doing just that. In rowing, where a high technical standard is required, spending time perfecting the connection and squaring up together is essential in becoming a proficient athlete and crew. However, stepping away from the boat and utilising other sports can aid in injury prevention and can improve mental wellbeing. Especially during the dark winter months.

In normal times many rowers, from those with their sights on the Olympics to individuals aiming to compete at club regattas, can be found in the weights section of their gym. Strength training is important as, through specific weight baring exercises, maximal strength is increased resulting in the ability to achieve greater peak power.

Incorporating yoga into a training plan can aid the development of supporting muscles...

Looking beyond the erg and weights, yoga has become increasingly popular amongst top level athletes and shouldn’t be overlooked. Injury through overuse or muscular imbalances can shorten one's season, or even career if disregarded as unimportant.

Incorporating yoga into a training plan can aid the development of supporting muscles such as the quadriceps and hamstrings that we require so much from through a season.

Mindfulness that is fused into most yoga flows can aid one’s ability to relax through the grind of life, as well as focusing the mind on the race ahead whilst waiting on the stakeboat for the starters gun.

As winter draws on, once again it is equally important to ensure long ergo sessions don’t become boring and repetitive. This year, more than mos,t with land sessions being completed alone, placing the handle down and picking up the trainers instead is a way to ensure the mind is stimulated through the cold, dark months ahead.

With many of us having spent far more time than we ever envisaged staring at the four wall of our homes, getting out into the fresh air with socially distanced company is not only a way to maintain training but also a brief escapism, and even a chance to soak up some British landscapes.


words by Eleanor Brinkhoff
photo by Abigail Keenan on Unsplash


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